Electronic Medical Records – Ensuring Continuity Of Patient Care

Last week, I read a story in The Star about a mother of eight who said she had a tubal ligation at one of our public hospitals after her eighth child but had two subsequent pregnancies.

Interestingly, she challenged the hospital, and according to the report, the facility said it could find no record of her being a patient despite her children being born there, as shown on their birth certificates.

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office physicians have different opinions about electronic records

A new study reports widespread agreement among physicians that maintaining electronic health records (EHRs) undermines their connection with patients. The analysis found, however, that hospital-based physicians most often decried how EHRs take time away from patient contact, while office-based physicians most often lamented that EHRs detract from the quality of their patient interactions.

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Electronic business transactions switchover could save healthcare $9 billion, report says

Providers now spend eight minutes on average, and up to 30 minutes on manual tasks like making phone calls, sending faxes and mailing correspondence.

Widespread adoption of electronic business transactions in healthcare continues to grow, but there’s still an opportunity for $9.4 billion in savings, according to new data released today in the 2016 CAQH Index.

Conducting resource-intensive manual transactions costs U.S. health plans and healthcare providers as much as $11 more per transaction, and on average $6 more than when they’re Continue reading “Electronic business transactions switchover could save healthcare $9 billion, report says”

New Data Show More Hospitals than Ever Making Information Available Electronically to Patients

To help individuals manage their health, beginning in 2011, the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs called on health care providers to enable patients to electronically view, download, and transmit their health information to a destination of the patient’s choice. In 2015, the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap [PDF – 2.6 MB] reaffirmed this objective.

New data released today by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) show that efforts to expand the availability of electronic health information are yielding significant results. Specifically, the data show that 95 percent of the Continue reading “New Data Show More Hospitals than Ever Making Information Available Electronically to Patients”

How to Take Charge of Your Medical Records

Patients have a lot to gain by getting access to their health information. They just need to know where to get it—and what to do with it.

‘What part of “Give us our damn data” do you not understand?’

For five days as her husband lay in his hospital bed suffering from kidney cancer, Regina Holliday begged doctors and nurses for his medical records, and for five days she never received them.

On the sixth day, her husband needed to be transferred to another hospital?—?without his complete medical records.

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Health data? I have no idea what to do with that!

You may think your smart watch or activity tracker can help you keep tabs on your health, but don’t be alarmed if your doctor might have a different vision. Wearable producers such as Apple, Fitbit, and Pebble will ship more than 76 million of the devices by the end of the year, according to market research firm IDC. Some doctors and researchers, however, remain unimpressed, they question the value of the particular metrics tracked, as well as the validity of the deluge of data these gadgets produce.

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You Will Be Able to Access Your Own Health Data

From the beginning, MediPortal has been dedicated to a simple but crucial vision and underlying belief that health data should be available to individuals and providers regardless of where care occurs.

After all, how many times have you arrived at a doctor’s appointment, only to have a clipboard handed to you to fill out your entire medical history, emergency contact information and information about other specialists you have seen? It has probably happened more than a few times, and with each handoff of the clipboard, you likely longed for a better way or wondered how it would all get taken care of in the event that you couldn’t fill out those forms yourself.
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